A NICE BIT OF STONE-CLADDING ©™ - Part 8

By Two Legs Good

Yes, it's another Sunny Soaraway Stone-Cladding Sunday!


Sorry for starting with what seems like a repeat, but please be patient and read on!


Remember this?

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Now, houses with A Nice Bit Of Stone-Cladding! ©™ are special. Very special. But some are more special than others, and this one is VERY special indeed. We can just imagine the argument that led to it...



So yes... stone-cladding AND wood-cladding on the one house. Actually, we're not sure that's really what it is - it looks more like a bizarre mix of crazy-paving and painted floorboards. (And just what is going on with that garden wall?)

As Paul McCartney and Stevie Wonder never sang:

"Wood-cladding and stone-cladding,
live together in perfect harmony
Side by side on the front of some house,
Oh lord, why don't we?"

Well, Stevie, maybe you'd have an excuse, but surely Paul, surely the man that wrote 'Eleanor Rigby', 'Hey Jude' AND 'Rupert And The Frog Song', could find the words to describe it you? In the meantime, to answer the question "why don't we?", well...




...THAT's why not!

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Did that jog your memory? Good!


We could hardly believe this when we saw it - it's the same wacky scheme all over again, but presented in a slightly different but no less half-arsed fashion.


Yes, it's all there; wood-clad upper half, this time ivory rather than ebony.


There's the crazy-paved lower half, this time roughly-hewn, multi-hued and probably installed by someone called Hugh. It looks like what a Hugh might do.


We'll get to the wacky outer wall in a wee while. First though, we'd like to ponder on the age-old question - which came first, wood-cladding or stone-cladding?


Looking at this from another angle makes it more obvious there's something else going on.


There's a cladding-war going on!


The wood-cladding seems to have annexed a significant part of the lower-half territory between the upper-half and the window in a straight-forward land-grab, giving it direct access to the door area.


However, the stone-cladding appears to now be retaliating with it's own flanking maneouvre, an incursion into the upper half around the porch and window roof. A cunning tactic, often successful.


Obviously, only one can win. It'll be a slow war, but we'll keep you informed.


And now, a few words from a special guest.




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